Subsidised memberships now available to Safeguarding Essentials

SGE Square IconsSince 2013, we have been supporting schools across the UK and beyond to deliver consistent, outstanding practice in online safety. Recently, we have added additional resources to our service to address wider safeguarding requirements.

To date, our online training has been completed over 130,000 times and over 100,000 downloadable resources have been accessed by our members.

However, we recognise that some of the schools who need the greatest support are those with the least resource, particularly financially, to overcome their challenges.


That’s why we have teamed up with our partners at Friendly WiFi to offer subsidised membership to those most in need - up to 100% discounts are available to qualifying schools.

Discover your discount now! Click here

How do schools qualify for subsidised membership?
Our subsidised memberships are allocated based on current Ofsted rating or school status.

What does membership include?
Membership to Safeguarding Essentials provides your school with a suite of resources to support your safeguarding provision, including teaching materials, guidance for colleagues, advice for parents, policy templates and online training courses for staff. A full list of downloadable resources can be found here

In addition, our supporters at Friendly WiFi are pleased to be offering their certification at exclusive rates, with up to 100% discount to qualifying schools.


What is Friendly WiFi?

Friendly WiFi is the world’s first safe certification standard for WiFi that shows users that they are being protected online from exposure to child sex abuse images and inappropriate adult content. The scheme was initiated by UK government and industry in a move to increase online safety measures for WiFi services, especially where children and young adults can be present.


For schools it is essential to have some form of safeguarding for their students and visitors when they access the WiFi available and by evidencing that their WiFi includes the correct filters, schools can become Friendly WiFi certified. Friendly WiFi status shows they are protected and that the school is taking responsibility for the online safety and health of their students whilst providing a safe browsing environment for all users.

To find out more, download a Friendly WiFi leaflet here

To find out if your school qualifies for discount, click here

Written by Safeguarding Essentials on July 16, 2018 12:05

Mobile Phones in the Classroom

Are mobile devices a positive or negative influence in schools?


Mobile PhoneThere has been much in the news recently about children having phones in schools.

Today, the chief inspector of Ofsted, Amanda Spielman supported schools who ban mobile phones.

As reported by the BBC, she is expected to say that the use of phones in the classroom in “dubious at best”. She claims that technology is to blame for “low-level disruption” and that taking a tough stance will endorse a tough behaviour policy in school.


This announcement follows news last week from the headmaster of Eton who endorsed the confiscation of mobile phones from pupils, having younger pupils hand their phones and mobile devices in at night-time.

A recent LSE study discussed in the Guardian found that “banning smartphone use in schools boosted results”.

The benefits of time away from digital devised are widely reported – indeed, this week it has also been reported that gaming addition has now been declared a media disorder and can be treated on the NHS. This reiterates the damage that persistent use of technology could cause.

However, is banning mobile phones in schools a step in the right direction.? Should schools instead be using the technology to encourage and educate about the many elements of our now connected lives?

It’s fair to say that opinion on this is divided. In reality, the capability mobile devices provide for computing, education, communication and organisation are extremely positive. However, finding the right time and place for both use and education is a situation yet to be resolved.

Have your say
How do you feel about mobile phones in school? Do you allow them in the classroom? Have you had good or bad experiences when it comes to mobile devices in school? Please use the comments section below to share your thoughts and experiences.

Written by Safeguarding Essentials on June 21, 2018 10:59

Leading from the front

The governing body is fundamental in driving a continued, proactive approach to online safety


Social Media TreeIn a world where technology seems to be evolving at an ever increasing pace, the role of the school governor has never been more important.

Whilst it’s difficult to imagine a time before social media existed, let alone the Internet, it’s incredible to think that it was actually only four and half years ago that Ofsted first incorporated the briefing for the inspection of e-safety into its section 5 criteria. Since then, things have changed dramatically, with regular revisions being applied to reflect changing ways in which technology is being both used and manipulated within our society.

Indeed, September 2016 saw some new additions, with Ofsted updating and republishing their guidance on ‘Inspecting Safeguarding in early years, education and skills’ to correspond with the changes to the latest version of the DfE’s Keeping Children Safe in Education’ statutory guidance on safeguarding. Amongst the updates included the clarification that designated members of staff for safeguarding need to have training every two years and their knowledge and skills should be refreshed at least annually.

One of the responsibilities of the governing body is to approve and promote the schools online safety policy and review its effectiveness, yet an Ofsted survey held as recently as 2015 revealed that 5% of schools still didn’t have an online safety policy and for those that did, only 74% of students were aware of it.

Whilst all schools should have a clearly defined online safety policy, a typed piece of paper will do little by itself, other than to serve as another box ticked. The key to the success of any initiative is how it is both managed and delivered. In the 2008 government report ‘Safer Children in an Online World’, it was found that schools who were ranked outstanding largely took a shared responsibility for the delivery of the policy, leaving it not just to the safeguarding staff, but including members of the wider workforce. The section 5 Ofsted assessment places great importance on the extent to which leaders, governors and managers create a positive culture and ethos where safeguarding is an important part of everyday life in the school setting, and this should be backed up by training at every level.

E-safety training is recommended for all governors, and best practice concedes that every school should have a nominated e-safety governor that remains separate from the ICT link governor as e-safety is recognised as a safeguarding, rather than an IT issue. The role of the e-safety governor involves overseeing 5 key areas:

  1. Managing, reviewing, promoting and evaluating the adherence to the online safety policy and strategy
  2. Ensuring the right mechanisms are in place to support pupils, staff and parents facing online safety issues, including the designation of a safeguarding lead who is trained to support staff and liaise with other agencies
  3. Making certain that all staff receive appropriate online safety training that is relevant and that the training is refreshed annually
  4. Measuring the effectiveness of child online safety education in the school, with the aim of delivering education that builds knowledge, skills and confidence
  5. Educating parents and the whole school community about online safety

With Ofsted having recently placed a greater emphasis on inspecting the effectiveness of the governing body, it’s become even more important that the governors work cohesively with the DSL and the senior leadership team, particularly in the area of safeguarding. This will drive the momentum required to continuously and proactively deliver online safety education and e-safety best practice throughout the year, not just if and when a safeguarding issue arises or when it is felt an inspection might be on the horizon.

So, whilst the online threats might have changed with the progression of technology, the reasons how and why schools perform well in online safety hasn’t. Strong leadership remains pivotal in the delivery of a successful policy, whilst training is vital in keeping knowledge and skills up to date. At the same time, assemblies, parent workshops, tutorial time, PSHE lessons, and an age-appropriate curriculum for e-safety all help pupils to become safe and responsible users of new technologies.



A checklist for governors is available to all E-safety Support Free members and can be downloaded from the guidance section of the dashboard. Governors can also learn more about their digital safeguarding responsibilities with our bespoke online training for governors, available to E-safety Support Premium Plus members

Social Media Devices

Written by Safeguarding Essentials on May 12, 2017 08:33


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