Interpreting the Ofsted Requirements for E-safety

Text BookIn September 2012, Ofsted issued the first briefing to its inspectors instructing them on how they should inspect e-safety in the schools they attend. The inspection authority’s ‘Inspecting e-safety in schools’ document has been updated regularly, with the last amendment being published at the start of this year.

The briefing has caused a fair degree of confusion within schools, with regard to interpreting its stipulations. What e-safety requirements school leadership should have in place with regard to their staff and students has caused the most uncertainty.

The document highlights a number of key features of good and outstanding practice, which cover a number of areas. Within this and subsequent blogs, we will look at the individual areas of the briefing and suggest how schools may deliver particular aspects successfully, in the eyes of Ofsted (or indeed, other inspection authorities) and to the benefit of schools.

Key Features of Good and Outstanding Practice - Whole school consistent approach

1. All teaching and non-teaching staff should have good recognition and awareness of e-safety issues.

This can be demonstrated by:

  • Having a repository of useful documents and articles relating to different aspects of e-safety.
  • - This gives helpful context when discussing e-safety in training sessions for staff as well as assisting students to understand during PSHE or ICT lessons focusing on e-safety.
    - Allows students and staff to keep up-to-date with new e-safety issues.
    - It also allows students and staff to privately browse the articles to improve recognition and awareness or help with projects relating to e-safety.
    - A repository can also be helpful when compiling an e-safety policy.
    - Can be used in school newsletters/websites to keep parents/guardians aware of modern e-safety issues to ensure that they can keep their children safe at home.

  • A comprehensive and up-to-date training scheme (see point 3)
  • 2. The senior management of schools have made e-safety a priority across all areas of the school.

    This can be demonstrated by:

  • The achievement of a recognised standard, such as the ‘E-safety mark’. The South-West Grid for Learning offers a free e-safety self-review tool to assist in achieving this standard.
  • The school having in place planned, comprehensive e-safety and safe-guarding programmes of study which must be embedded within all aspects of each year group’s curriculum such as within PSHE/ICT schemes of work, lesson plans and classroom resources.
  • Evidence of the use of a wide range of age-appropriate e-safety resources that utilise modern digital technologies to deliver e-safety information in an engaging manner for 21st century students.
  • Evidence of relevant and up-to-date e-safety content and safe-guarding facilities (reporting CEOP buttons etc.) contained within the school’s online presence such as its VLE, learning platform or website.
  • The school should ensure that e-safety and safe-guarding are also embedded in other school activities such as extended school provision.
  • The school e-safety plan possessing breadth and progression such as evidence that an audit of e-safety provision is regularly carried out and, if areas of improvement or development are identified, these should be addressed in a timely manner.
  • Students possessing knowledge and awareness of e-safety issues and understanding the importance of following the school’s e-safety and acceptable use policies. This can be addressed in relevant lessons and assemblies.
  • Programmes whereby students are involved in e-safety education such as peer-monitoring or student-led assemblies.
  • Effective education, monitoring and protection of vulnerable students who may be at risk from both their own online activities and those of others.
  • 3. Training in e-safety has been given a high priority in order to increase both expertise and internal knowledge capacity.

    This could be demonstrated by:

  • Provision of recognised comprehensive programmes of e-safety training for teaching and non-teaching staff across the whole school by organisations such as Fantastict or E2BN.
  • Use of resources provided by www.e-safetysupport.com and other online e-safety information providers to support staff awareness training.
  • Comprehensive use of resources such as the videos available from CEOP to train students to seriously consider their personal online actions and behaviour.
  • 4. They value the contribution that students, their parents and the wider community can make and that this is integrated into the whole school e-safety strategy.

    This could be demonstrated by:

  • The implementing of clear channels of reporting of potential e-safety issues by both students and parents. These could take the form of:
  • - Nominated, trained individual members of staff and peer-monitors that parents or students could approach personally in the event of an e-safety issue.
    - A specific email address or telephone contact that parents use to alert the school of potential issues or to request advice on e-safety.
    - Regular in-school events to allow dialogue to take place between parents and teaching staff where advice and information could be offered regarding e-safety and safe-guarding issues.
    - Promoting access to parents to the school’s repository of articles and resources in order to raise awareness and knowledge of e-safety issues at home.

    These are just some suggestions on how you may develop your e-safety provision. If you would like to share your thoughts on implementing e-safety policy and practice in your school, we would love to hear from you. Please use the comments form below.

    Further ideas on how to demonstrate key features of good and outstanding practice will be brought to you in future articles.

    Written by Steve Gresty on January 23, 2014 12:48

    Naace Strategic Conference – 27-28 March 2014

    Naace ConferenceThe Naace Strategic Conference 2014 takes places in Nottingham on 27-28 March and will see Naace celebrate its 30th anniversary. The conference is open to both Naace members and non-members and is suitable for teachers, school leaders, advisors and consultants working within and across all phases of UK education.

    The conference will address how to be outstanding in a world full of technology and the implications of this. Areas such as school improvement and raising standards, meeting technical challenges and e-twinning are hot topics for those involved in technology education. We’ll be addressing these issues, whilst providing plenty of opportunities for you to network with colleagues and discuss the latest developments in educational technology.

    The conference will question:

  • Is outstanding teaching possible without good use of technology? What does a school need to put in place to enable all the teachers to be outstanding?

  • Is the 'flipping' of learning something every school should be working on, enabling pupils to extend learning and time in school to be used more productively?

  • Does proper demonstration of progression and achievement require online access to pupils' work and teachers' records?

  • How can schools best capitalise on the communication, collaboration and access to learning opened up by Internet?
  • Every school leader, and every teacher in all subjects, needs to know the answer to these questions. If you want to advance education, this is the conference to advance your understanding of how best to do it.

    Confirmed Keynote speakers for the event include:

    • John Anderson - Managing inspector, ETI, Northern Ireland
    • Jim Fanning - Head of emerging technologies, Education Scotland
    • Lindsay Harvey - Head of Digital Learning, DfES, Welsh Government
    • Janet Hayward - Chair of National Digital Learning Council for Wales
    • Rhian Kavanagh - e-skills
    • Jeff Smith - Director IET Associates and Consultant to Brent Schools Partnership
    • Professor Celia Hoyles OBE & Professor Richard Noss - London Knowledge Lab
    • Kirsten Campbell-Howes - Soda
    • Peter Yeomans - Plymouth University
    • Jan Harrison - Naace
    • Tim Scratcherd - School House Partnership
    • Dr Carol Porter - Children's Service, Bury LA
    • Tim Rylands & Sarah Neild - So into It

    Alongside the Keynote Sessions and Naace Impact Awards presentations, visitors will be able to network at NaaceShare and discover top new products at the exhibition.

    To complement the engaging keynote speakers, there are also some excellent breakout sessions, including:

    • iPads for learning
    • Maximising the Computing Curriculum - one school's approach
    • Leading your school to the 3rd Millennium Learning Award
    • Translating learner voice
    • Quad-blogging
    • e-safety
    • 100 Word challenge - raising writing standards
    • Digital Leaders Academy
    • Effective use of SIMS
    • Making digital tools work for learners
    • and much more!!

    For more details and to book online, please visit www.naace.co.uk/events/conference2014

    Written by Safeguarding Essentials on January 15, 2014 09:58

    The Tablet Revolution and E-safety Education

    E-safety TabletAs the latest sales figures for the Christmas shopping frenzy begin being released, it’s no surprise that technological gadgets are leading the charge.

    It is reported that Microsoft sold 364,000 Xbox Ones while Sony sold 530,000 PS4s in the UK in the lead up to Christmas. The sale of digital games (which includes mobile gaming, PC and console downloads) is said to have grown by 16.4% taking it to a value of £1.18 billion and video games have also grown in the UK by 6.6% overall in 2013.

    However, it is the ‘tablet revolution’ which makes the most striking impact on our engagement with the online world. Post Christmas sales figures estimate that 12-13 million units were sold in the UK which means that now over half of the UK population now owns or has access to a tablet. This huge leap has been fuelled by the emergence of retailer branded tablets (from the likes of Argos and Tesco) which are available at a much cheaper price than the market leading iPad – making tablets more financially accessible to more people.

    The BBC recently reported that over the Christmas period, viewing of their iPlayer service saw mobile devices overtake computers for the first time - with access to the internet now so readily available it’s easy to understand why.

    So where does e-safety come into all of this?

    I spoke to colleagues, family and friends in the lead up to Christmas and found that the youngest request for a tablet came from 7 year olds – and some of them were getting their wish. Of course iPhones, laptops and consoles were also popular across all ages too.

    So Christmas morning comes and the excited child (or indeed adult!) opens up the tiny box sitting under the tree to reveal the shiny new tablet and they are away - with full access to the internet. But how many of the parents set up filters, or activated parental controls before they wrapped the gift? I suspect far fewer than were prepared to admit.

    It is this freedom to roam the internet, warts-n-all, that adds weight to the argument for education over prohibition when it comes to e-safety. It’s all very well having filters on school systems and parental controls on PCs at home, but with so many more children now having the world at their fingertips they not only have the ability to access the wealth of information available online but also can potentially become susceptible to the dangers that the environment offers too.

    Written by Safeguarding Essentials on January 09, 2014 09:35


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