Live streaming: protecting children from exploitation

What is live streaming, why do young people do it and what are the risks?


Children Video StreamingIn figures release today by children's charity Barnardo's, their new survey conducted by YouGov found that 57% of 12-year-olds and more than one-in-four children aged 10 (28%) have admitted live streaming content over the Internet.

The figures also revealed that almost a quarter of 10 to 16 year-olds (24%) say they or a friend have regretted posting live content on apps and websites. But what is live steaming and what is the attraction?

What is live streaming?
Live streaming is the broadcasting of live events as they happen, over the Internet, to a potentially unlimited audience base. Websites or apps can be used to live stream and, depending on particular preferences and settings, events can be broadcast to the world or a selected audience. Typically, mobile phones are used to live stream due to their portability and their built-in cameras, but webcams connected to laptops or computers can also be used.

Why do young people live stream?
Being able to share news, an event or an opinion with the world is particularly appealing to modern generations, who have grown up with mobile technologies and are used to being constantly connected. Inspired by online celebrity live streamers, young people may have a desire to share their lives online too and some want to follow in the steps of their online heroes.

Young people may live stream whilst they are playing games so that their audiences can watch and share in their experiences, they may broadcast a special event, such as a party, or they may just want to interact with strangers.

What are the risks?
When broadcasting over the Internet, it’s easy for young people to feel safe due to physical boundaries and this itself leads to increased vulnerability. People may attempt to trick, blackmail or coerce children during a time when their typical defences are down, and this may lead to riskier behaviour. In cases of online grooming, predators have targeted children and used trickery and grooming techniques to get them to perform acts of a sexual nature in front of the camera. This is classified as a ‘non-contact’ abuse offence, but is still sexual abuse.

Young people may not have an understanding of how what they are broadcasting could be saved and shared further and they may not know that people watching may not be who they say they are.

Research this month from the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) found that children as young as three had exposed themselves online, that 96% of the victims were girls and that in almost all of the cases that they investigated, children were broadcasting from their home environments. Read more at www.iwf.org.uk

Helping young people keep safe
It’s imperative that all young people using online services have a good understanding of key online safety messages:

  • The importance of protecting their private information;
  • The knowledge that people may pretend to be people they’re not;
  • The understanding of what they share online can be saved and shared by others;
  • The knowledge of what to do if they are being bullied or coerced;
  • The importance of asking for help if needed.
  • It’s also important that younger generations have a secure understanding of healthy relationships; that they shouldn’t feel under pressure to act in a certain way, that no one has the right to ask them to do something that makes them feel uncomfortable and that their bodies are theirs.

    Personal, social and health education, alongside quality sex and relationships education from an early age, could help reduce incidences of online abuse.

    Resources for professionals and parents

    Primary-aged children:

  • Play Like Share
  • I saw your willy video
  • Secondary-aged children:

  • Matt Thought He Knew


  • The E-safety Support membership package available from Safeguarding Essentials offers an extensive range of resources supporting Internet safety education including teaching resources and training for staff across a range of topics - Find out more

    To ensure you receive notifications when articles are published, join our free membership service today!

    Written by Matt Lovegrove on May 24, 2018 10:51

    Safeguarding Annual Events

    A reminder of the safeguarding and e-safety related events and activities held throughout the year


    Calendar Apr 17In addition to the important dates such as examinations, residential trips and parents evenings, schools are encouraged to look at including awareness days into the school calendar to focus on issues which relate to the social and emotional well-being of children and young people.

    The benefit for schools in engaging in these days is that the organisations who organise these events often have resources such as lesson plans, so that teachers don’t have to start from scratch when putting together lessons. Also, it is a good way of evidencing ways that you promote safeguarding and e-safety to others, e.g. parents, which can be included in any self-reviews or information for Ofsted.

    In addition, awareness days often generate publicity from local or national media, so stakeholders may be more interested in attending events or receiving literature which relate to them. Many organisations offer speakers and who can come into school and offer an additional perspective when talking about these subject areas.

    Whilst schools may not be able to cover all awareness days that relate to safeguarding and e-safety, it is important to pick out a couple, and establish them in the school calendar. Here are some suggestions:

    January
    BETT - 23rd - 26th January 2019
    Data Protection Day - 28th January

    February
    Children's Mental Health Week
    Safer Internet Day - 5th February 2019
    No Tech for Breck Day
    Sexual Abuse & Sexual Violence Awareness Week

    March
    National Safeguarding Month
    SIAD: Self-Injury Awareness Day - 1st March
    National Child Sexual Exploitation Awareness Day - 18th March

    April
    Stress Awareness Month
    Childnet Film Competition

    May
    Mental Health Awareness Week

    June
    World Anti=Bullying Forum - 4th - 6th June 2019
    Child Safety Week
    Stand up to Bullying Day
    Stop Cyber Bullying Day
    GoGadgetFree/Unplug
    How safe are children? 2019 NSPCC conference

    July
    Disability Awareness Day
    World Emoji Day - 17th July

    August
    International Youth Day - 12th August

    September
    Scroll Free September
    World Suicide Prevention Day - 10th September
    Sexual Health Week - 24th - 30th September 2018
    Pupil Voice Week - 24th - 28th September 2018

    October
    Bullying Prevention Month (Cybersmile Foundation)
    World Mental Health Day - 10th October
    National Hate Crime Awareness Week - 13th - 20th October 2018
    Get Safe Online Day

    November
    National Stress Awareness Day - 7th November 2018
    Wear Blue for Bullying Day - 9th November 2018
    Digital Kids Show - 10th - 11th November 2018
    Anti-bullying Week - 12th - 16th November 2018
    Alcohol Awareness Week - 19th - 25th November 2018

    December



    If you have an event that you would like to include in this list, please email tina@safeguardingessentials.com or use the comments section below.

    Written by Safeguarding Essentials on December 05, 2018 13:50

    How do we get parents involved in Internet safety?

    Ideas and suggestions to help improve parental engagement in e-safety issues

    When it comes to young people, we hear all too often that online safety is not just a matter for teachers to educate our pupils, but for parents to take responsibility and for the Internet providers to provide adequate protection at the source. While the latter is a cause that the government is positioned to handle, it still seems that schools are not only in charge of pupil education, but also getting parents up-to-speed too.

    The challenge of engaging parents in matters of e-safety is perpetual. Here are E-safety Support we very often speak to schools who are struggling to get the message across to the parents – be that due to poor attendance at open evenings, or simply because it’s just easier for the parent to hand over the iPad to the child because they know how to use it better!

    Empowering pupils

    However, we also hear some great ideas from schools about how they are dealing with the issue – most recently from Matthew Moss High School in Rochdale. During a recent e-safety day, the school took the decision to empower the children in taking the Internet safety message home to their parents. The pupils completed the online parent training (available from E-safety Support) and then went on to developing posters and slides that they could share with their parents.



    Dave Leonard, ICT Manager at Matthew Moss commented, "Having already distributed the ‘Get E-Smart’ pupil training to all students in KS3 we were looking for ways to reinforce the e-safety message to learners. One issue that we face, in common with many schools, is making parents and carers aware of the importance of e-safety. I discussed this with our Head of Family who was running the e-safety day and we decided to try to switch things around by asking learners to train their parents. We used the ‘E-safety Training for Parents’ course as the basis of our work with students and they produced resources and examples with which to facilitate discussions with their parents. The students enjoyed the sense of responsibility and it was a very effective way of ensuring that e-safety is considered at home as well as at school"

    Other ideas for schools

    Below are some other suggestions that could help engagement with parents at your school.

    Parent assemblies - Have your pupils run an e-safety parents assembly – this could be quite powerful if the children themselves point out the risks that they need their parents to help protect them from. Prior to holding such an event, carry out an audit (one is available to E-safety Support Premium Plus members) to highlight key areas of concern, which can then be pinpointed within the session.

    Homework books - If your pupils have homework books, perhaps a regular tip, news headline or similar could be included in that to keep the message getting out.

    School events - Have an e-safety 'stall' at your next school fair. This could provide an opportunity for parents to have a chat about any concerns they may have or to simply be given more information in a less formal setting.

    AUP - Have parents signed an acceptable use policy? Again, this is something you can download from E-safety Support and issue via email.

    Pupil surveys - Carry out anonymous surveys of your pupils about time spent online, usage of social media, how they feel about cyberbullying etc and share these results with parents – they may be surprised by the findings.

    Videos - If you are using videos from CEOP / NSPCC for example in the classroom, send the link to parents so they can watch it too

    Dedicated web page - Make sure your website includes the name of the teacher responsible for e-safety. You could also include:

    1. The e-safety news feed available to all E-safety Support members
    2. A CEOP video - you could start with the one on the subject of grooming, but change it to other topical ones over time - CEOP have a bank of parent videos you could choose from
    3. A link to your school e-safety policy
    4. A link to live stats on web activity to demonstrate the enormity of it (eg http://www.internetlivestats.com/)
    5. Links to the external parent resources such as Internet Matters, Parent Zone, Family Lives and so on
    6. The 'Click CEOP' reporting button

    If you have any suggestions that you would like to share with other teachers, please use the comment section below.

    Images courtesy of the pupils at Matthew Moss High School

    Written by Safeguarding Essentials on March 27, 2018 12:50


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