Young people spend more than SIX hours a day feeling stressed or worried

Today marks the start of National Safeguarding Month with UK Youth launching their #KeepMeSafe campaign

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UK Youth polled 1,000 18-25-year-olds and found that young people spend more than six hours a day feeling stressed or worried. Money, appearance and career worries as well as fears about the future mean a large chunk of their time is spent feeling anxious or under pressure.

One in 10 young people feel they have no-one to turn to discuss their concerns, leaving them battling through alone.

A further 67 per cent admitted they had come across problems in their life where they felt they had nobody to lean on for help.

As a result, 56 per cent have ended up in more trouble after keeping a problem to themselves rather than confiding in someone else.

A spokesperson for UK Youth said: “It’s concerning to see just how long young people spend feeling worried or stressed and how many of them have to go through these issues alone, without anyone to turn to for advice and guidance.

“Despite living in our ever-connected world, young people need safe spaces more than ever. For many, their local youth club is the only place that provides them with a trusted adult to confide in and access to the advice, support and guidance needed to feel safe and build bright futures.

“But to stop young people feeling worried or stressed in a society where issues of grooming, online peer pressure, extremism and hate crimes are rising, many youth services need to be supported with additional safeguarding resources and training to #KeepMeSafe.”

That’s why UK Youth have launched their new #KeepMeSafe campaign, which calls on all organisations working with young people to Stop what they’re doing, Look at their safeguarding policies, Listen to young people and take action during National Safeguarding Month.

Their study also found that despite spending such a huge amount of time feeling concerned, the average young person has just four people they feel they could turn to for help.

And although 18-25-year-olds having an average of 165 ‘friends’ on social media, 85 per cent still have moments where they feel lonely.

In fact, more than 40 per cent think social media only adds to their worries and stress with more than half of those saying it leaves them feeling under more pressure to keep up with everyone.

Others say they struggle with the lack of privacy, (29%), the pressure to impress others (40%) and feeling like they need to make their live sound better than it really is (33%).

But researchers found that even those who do have someone they can approach with a problem don’t always get the help they need with more than half admitting they have felt ‘fobbed off’ or ignored by someone.

And 68 per cent find it difficult to share problems in the first place.

This leads to more than six in 10 respondents being more likely to battle on alone than go to anyone else if they have a problem or need advice.

UK Youth’s spokesperson added: “Safeguarding has hit the headlines recently but it’s something we’ve been working to strengthen for a long time now. Research from our network and these new stats suggest the needs of young people have transformed in the last few years due to online/offline pressures and societal changes, which means an increased the level of support is needed to #KeepMeSafe.

“We’ve taken the positive approach to support our membership and work with colleagues across the youth sector to improve safeguarding and better support young people at a grass roots level in youth organisations across the UK. We’ve developed a safeguarding programme and assurance scheme to set a benchmark for youth organisations and support the delivery of a minimum level of practice consistent with operating a safe organisation.

“After the success of last year’s launch of National Safeguarding Month and in light of recent events, we hope our #KeepMeSafe campaign encourages all organisations working with young people take time to Stop what they’re doing, Look at their safeguarding policies, Listen to their young people and take action.”

#KeepMeSafe will run throughout National Safeguarding Month (from 1st-31st March) - Find out more about #KeepMeSafe here .

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Safeguarding Essentials

Providing a holistic approach to protect children against both offline and online risks is vital. This is why we are launching Safeguarding Essentials, a comprehensive service for Safeguarding future generations.

Safeguarding Essentials will provide a comprehensive range of safeguarding resources including teacher training, classroom resources, policies, checklists and parent guides, to better equip schools in preventing and detecting current risks faced by children.

Our new service will be accessible anytime and anywhere, empowering teachers to have the latest knowledge at their fingertips to deliver outstanding safeguarding practices with ease.

Further information about the new resources will be coming soon. Existing E-safety Support members will be notified via your weekly email bulletin. If you are not already an E-safety Support member, you can register your interest in the new Safeguarding Essentials service.

Written by E-safety Support on March 01, 2018 10:23

Digital Friendships Report

Highlights from the UK Safer Internet Centre report into the role of technology in young people's relationships

UKSIC Digital FriendshipsThe report states that the "findings reveal how central technology is to young people’s relationship and the many different platforms they are using to interact with each other. It also highlights both the positive and negative role that technology can play in young people’s relationships and that whilst they are proactively helping to build a better internet, they also want support from the adults in their lives to do so".

The report identifies the positive effects of online relationships, with the majority of young people having positive experiences and interactions online:

  • In the last year, more than four in five (83%) of 8-17s have experienced people being kind to them online
  • 68% of young people said that chatting to their friends online cheers them up
  • The most popular platforms 8-17 year olds are using to chat to their friends on a daily basis are YouTube (41%), WhatsApp (32%), Snapchat (29%), Instagram (27%) and Facebook or Facebook Messenger (26%)

    Young people aged 8-17 are using a variety of methods to express themselves online with emojis being the most popular (84%) followed by slang terms (72%), facial expressions in selfies (70%) and images (63%).

    Encouragingly, In the last year, 88% respondents said they had sent a kind message online to a friend who was feeling upset.

    However, the report also identifies the negative impact of online relationships with over half (54%) of respondents aged 8-17 saying that they would feel isolated if they couldn’t talk to their friends via technology and two in five (40%) respondents stating that they feel left out when people post things they haven’t been included in.

    Over a third of young people (36%) say that they feel that other people’s lives look more exciting than theirs on social media with girls more likely to feel this (40%) in comparison to boys (33%).

    The report identifies the support that young people are seeking when it comes to online relationships with more than seven in ten (72%) of those surveyed wanting their school to teach them about cyberbullying and how to manage friendships online. However, almost three in five (58%) respondents aged 8-17 say that they feel that teachers don’t always understand their online lives and 28% don’t feel like their parents or carers do.

    In conclusion, the report recommends that schools play an important role in educating and empowering children and young people to use technology respectfully, responsibly, critically and creatively, and in establishing a culture of kindness and supportiveness that promotes student wellbeing. From Computing to Relationships Education and PSHE, it is essential that education keeps pace with changes in technology, to ensure that interventions are relevant, engaging and effective. Schools play an important role in offering positive opportunities for learning and creativity, as well as helping young people to harness the power of technology to make a positive difference. This report shows the range of strategies that young people would use if something upset them online and schools can help to ensure young people both know and use these strategies to cope with any difficulties they experience.

    The full report can be downloaded from the UK Safer Internet Centre website
    UKSIC Digital Friendships Grahpic

    Written by E-safety Support on February 16, 2018 11:37

    SID2018 - Competition Winners

    We are delighted to have received so many entries for our SID2018 competition, supporting the Safer Internet Day 2018 theme, ‘Create, Connect and Share Respect: a better Internet starts with you’.

    The competition generated some great Tweets. The judging was once again quite a challenge. However, we are now delighted to announce the winners.

    Best Primary School Tweet

    The winning entry in the Primary School category came in the form of a video from the pupils at Duneane Primary School

    Our judges said, "The pupils have all got involved in the video and the catchy tune will help them to remember the key Internet safety messages they are delivering."

    Kerrie Wilson, Duneane Principal added, "We are a small school in Co Antrim and all our children were involved in our internet safety rap. The children worked together to produce the lyrics and the actions to illustrate them. One of our teachers, Mrs Cuthbertson then added a touch of her musical flair! Lucky for us the PSNI were delivering a safer internet talk and happy to lend us their car. In line with the SID2018 mantra, we wanted to create something positive which promoted key safety messages. We hoped to connect to the world in a respectful way. What’s more the staff and children had such fun making it."

    The entry from Walford Primary School was selected as Highly Commended in this category

    Best Secondary School Tweet

    The winning entry in the Secondary School category came from Felsted School

    The internet is written in PEN NOT PENCIL

    Our judges said, "This simple message is a clear reminder that information shared on the Internet is not temporary and removing unwanted messages or information is incredibly difficult."

    Tina Oakley-Agar from Felsted School added, "As part of our Safer Internet Day at Felsted School, the year 9 students took up the challenge of writing a tip on how to keep safe on the Internet. There was some lively debate about how they use the Internet, their digital footprint and the risks involved. Finally, they thought about how to write a memorable tip suitable for tweeting."

    The entry from Boswells School was selected as Highly Commended in this category

    Thank you to everyone for getting involved in the competition. There were some fantastic entries and we would like to congratulate all the pupils and teachers who got involved. Well Done! All the entries can be found on Twitter @EsafetySuppport

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    Written by E-safety Support on February 08, 2018 09:46

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